Connecticut

Connecticut

Officials at the Department of Environmental Protection maintain that the majority of sightings are either bobcats or coyotes, and cite the lack of physical evidence (no footprints, no dead carcases, etc.).

  • Support Grand Teton National Park’s Preferred Alternative for Moose-Wilson

     • The Cougar Fund
  • More cougar sightings

     • The Cougar Fund

    More Connecticut residents are reporting seeing an animal they believe to be a mountain lion.

  • A great examination of mountain lion “sightings” in the Northeast

     • The Cougar Fund

    Four years on from the South Dakota cougar that made it all the way to Connecticut, people in northeastern states are still enthralled by the idea that mountain lions might be roaming the forests. While there are some who strongly believe the cats are present, experts agree that any reported sightings of cougars are pets that have been released or misidentifications (of coyotes or bobcats).

  • Could this possibly be in the future?

     • The Cougar Fund

    At least one cougar expert believes the cat could someday recolonize the northeast United States.

  • Experts: Cougars Could Return to Northeast

     • The Cougar Fund

    Many biologists agree that the northeast US possesses large tracts of suitable habitat for the cats. Now, some believe that recent long-distance dispersals suggest cougars are capable of recolonizing northeastern states they have long been extirpated from.

  • Proceedings of the 11th Mountain Lion Workshop

     • The Cougar Fund

    Proceedings of the 11th Mountain Lion Workshop
    Integrating Scientific Findings into Management
    Hunter Conference Center, Southern Utah University
    Cedar City, Utah
    May 12‐15, 2014

  • Integrating Values and Ethics into Wildlife Policy and Management—Lessons from North America

     • The Cougar Fund

    Fox and Bekoff (2011)

    Abstract: Few animals provoke as wide a range of emotions as wolves. Some see wolves as icons of a lost wilderness; others see them as intruders. As the battle continues between wolf proponents and opponents, finding solutions that resolve conflicts while supporting the integrity of nature is challenging. In this essay we argue that we need to make room for wolves and other native carnivores who are re-colonizing areas from which they were extirpated. Strategies that foster coexistence are necessary and wildlife agencies must consider all stakeholders and invest adequate resources to inform the public about how to mitigate conflicts between people/domestic animals, and predators. Values and ethics must be woven into wildlife policy and management and we must be willing to ask difficult ethical questions and learn from past mistakes.